Kodiak Daily Mirror - Teenager Ugandan artists featured at library during Art Walk
  
Teenager, Ugandan artists featured at library during Art Walk
by Julie Herrmann
Jun 09, 2014 | 87 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
These strings of Ugandan paper beads were on display and for sale during the First Friday Artwalk. (Julie Herrmann photo)
These strings of Ugandan paper beads were on display and for sale during the First Friday Artwalk. (Julie Herrmann photo)
slideshow
Local student Kierra Murphy created this window in the Kodiak Public Library from Japanese glass floats that she and her family found on the beach. (Julie Herrmann photo)
Local student Kierra Murphy created this window in the Kodiak Public Library from Japanese glass floats that she and her family found on the beach. (Julie Herrmann photo)
slideshow
During the First Friday Art Walk, participants stopped in at the Kodiak Public Library to enjoy two types of art that were worlds apart.

At the front of the library, photographs from Uganda were on display, along with beaded necklaces made from colored pieces of newspaper.

The Ugandan photos and necklaces are part of a library-to-library exchange.

In 2013, several Kodiak residents spent time in Uganda. They worked in libraries and conducted training for making films about peace and conflict resolution.

"While in Koboko, they met women who dreamed of having a library," said Kodiak library director Katie Baxter.

They brought backstories from Uganda as well as the beaded necklaces, which are handmade. There were dozens in all colors for sale during first Friday and are still available at the library.

All the proceeds go to the Kodiak Public Library Association, which will use them toward a library in the community of Koboko, Uganda.

A grand total of just $5,000 will allow the library to be built.

At the back of the library, local teenager Kierra Murphy showed off a window made from dozens of Japanese glass floats. The windows used at least 100 of the balls, all collected by Murphy and her family from beaches on the Alaska Peninsula.

"And we have lots more at our house," Murphy said.

She got her inspiration at home, where her family had created a similar window in their house.

"It's nice because it covers up, but still lets light in," Murphy said.

She submitted a proposal to create the windows as part of the percent for art Alaska statute, which requires that one percent of public building costs go towards artwork.

The glass balls cover part of two windows in the library. Each window is made of two glass panels, with the balls in between. They will be a permanent part of the library.

Contact Julie Herrmann at jherrmann@kodiakdailymirror.com

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