Kodiak Daily Mirror - Track pouring begins as Baranof Park Improvements Project passes 60th day
  
Track pouring begins as Baranof Park Improvements Project passes 60th day
by James Brooks
Jul 19, 2012 | 177 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Matt Flores, left and Angel Martinez pour out the first layer of the new Baranof Park running track from a trash can barrel where it was mixed Wednesday afternoon, July 18, 2012. At background are Jacob Dixon, left and Rick Hardin.
(James Brooks photo)
Matt Flores, left and Angel Martinez pour out the first layer of the new Baranof Park running track from a trash can barrel where it was mixed Wednesday afternoon, July 18, 2012. At background are Jacob Dixon, left and Rick Hardin. (James Brooks photo)
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Jacob Dixon spreads sealant across the concrete foundation of the new Baranof Park track on Wednesday afternoon, July 18, 2012. The sealant is the first step in creating the new track. At background is Rick Hardin, directing the pour of the track surface.
(James Brooks photo)
Jacob Dixon spreads sealant across the concrete foundation of the new Baranof Park track on Wednesday afternoon, July 18, 2012. The sealant is the first step in creating the new track. At background is Rick Hardin, directing the pour of the track surface. (James Brooks photo)
slideshow
Jacob Dixon of Fresno, Calif. spreads sealant across the concrete foundation of the new Baranof Park track Wednesday afternoon, July 18, 2012. Dixon, who works for Beynon Co., is a member of the crew installing the new track one thin layer at a time. When complete, the surface will be identical in composition to the one used this summer at the University of Oregon during qualifying for the London Olympics, said crew leader Rick Hardin.
(James Brooks photo)
Jacob Dixon of Fresno, Calif. spreads sealant across the concrete foundation of the new Baranof Park track Wednesday afternoon, July 18, 2012. Dixon, who works for Beynon Co., is a member of the crew installing the new track one thin layer at a time. When complete, the surface will be identical in composition to the one used this summer at the University of Oregon during qualifying for the London Olympics, said crew leader Rick Hardin. (James Brooks photo)
slideshow
Poured from a plastic tank into a gray plastic trash barrel, the new Baranof Park running track looks like nothing but cherry Kool-aid.

Spread it across a concrete foundation and let it harden in the summer sun, and it starts looking like something a jogger could enjoy.

Sixty days since the first shovel dug in to start the Baranof Park Improvements Project, the park is beginning to resemble its old self. By Aug. 1 — if the sun continues to shine — the track will be laid down alongside a new artificial turf field placed atop a gravel field that has been graded during the project’s first two months.

On Wednesday, employees of Oregon-based Benyon Co. poured a coating layer of red plastic atop a concrete and asphalt foundation laid down during the first 60 days. Rick Hardin, the manager of the pouring, explained the process. The work being done this week is a base layer to seal the concrete and asphalt. Additional layers will be put down, thicker and tougher, and the final layer will include rubber pellets designed to withstand the pounding of running feet and falling rain.

It’s the same surface used at collegiate tracks across the United States, including at the University of Oregon, which this summer hosted qualifying for the Olympics.

As the track is laid down, a few feet away, other workers will be laying down artificial turf.

In a presentation to the Kodiak city council, engineer Bob Harding explained how that process will happen. “We get an 80,000 square-foot piece of carpet, basically,” he said.

As he passed around a piece of test turf, he explained how the turf will be stitched together, then backed with a type of sand material as it is put down.

The equipment to maintain that sandy layer is included in the cost of the turf.

“The turf is warranted to drain vertically at 20 inches an hour,” he said. “Even in a pouring rain, you should be able to play on the field.”

For now, the project’s play date has been set at Oct. 1. That’s the day everything should be down, ready and set to kick off.
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