Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
Alutiiq Word of the Week
 
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Feb. 1
Anaqiitaq : Sea Cucumber_ Allrani gwangkuta nertaartukut anaqiitanek. : Sometimes we eat sea cucumbers The sea cucumber is an echinoderm, a creature related to sea urchins and sea stars. There are many varieties of sea cucumbers found in Alaska waters, from intertidal areas to the edge of the continental shelf. Sea cucumbers are known for their ability to expel and regrow their digestive systems, a process each an...
Feb 01, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Jan. 25
StaaRistaq: Church Warden StaaRistam agayuwik carlia’araa. : The church warden takes care of the church. Many of Alaska’s Russian Orthodox communities share clergy. Clergymen typically live in the largest community in a parish and serve smaller, outlying communities periodically. In the Kodiak region, for example, clergy stationed in the city of Kodiak and in Old Harbor travel to surrounding villages several times...
Jan 25, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Jan. 18
Palicuuskiiq; Palit’saq: Police Officer_ Maani palit’sat amlertut.: There are many policemen here. Although police officers are a relatively new addition to Alutiiq villages, law enforcement is not. Until Alaska achieved statehood and its communities fell under a state judicial system, Alutiiq leaders acted as peacekeepers and judges. A village’s traditional council, led by a locally appointed chief, maintained or...
Jan 18, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Jan. 11
Kungyuk : Crested Auklet_ Kungyut amlertaallriit kangiyagmi. : There used to always be a lot of crested auklets in the bay. The crested auklet (Aethia cristatella), known by some as the sea quail, is a member of the alcid family, a group that includes auks, puffins, and murres. About two million of these sea birds live in Alaska, in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands, but they range as far as the Kurile Island of...
Jan 11, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Jan. 4
Kicarwik: Anchorage_ Kicarwigmen agkutartua ernerpak. I am going to go to Anchorage today. Anchorage, Alaska’s largest city, lies 250 miles north of the Kodiak Archipelago, at the far northern end of Cook Inlet. In many ways, Anchorage is a gateway to the Alutiiq world. Airline flights to Homer, Cordova, Kodiak, and King Salmon, the major hubs in the Alutiiq homeland, originate in Anchorage. To enter or leave the ...
Jan 04, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Dec. 28
Mecuuluni : Wet_ Itganka mecuu’ut. : My feet are wet. In Kodiak’s cool, wet environment, staying dry is a constant battle. Alutiiq people, who thrived in this moist land for thousands of years before rubber boots and Gore-Tex, devised many ingenious ways to keep from getting wet. Hunters coated the sea lion skin coverings of their kayaks with oil to make them waterproof. Seamstresses fashioned lightweight, flexibl...
Dec 28, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Dec. 21
Naaqisuuteq : Book_ Naaqitaartukut. : We read (books). Alaska’s gold rush was followed by wave of scientific inquiry. As the state’s infrastructure grew and travel became easier, researchers made their way north to study everything from geology to wildlife biology. Anthropologists were among the researchers. In the early decades of the twentieth century, men and women interested in recording cultural traditions vi...
Dec 21, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Dec. 14
Ciquq : Ice_ Nanwat ciqumaut. : The lakes are frozen over. Kodiak may lie south of the frozen Arctic, but from 1852 to 1870, it was a known for its ice. In the 1850s, the California gold rush was in full swing, and the West Coast needed ice to preserve food. Russian-American Company officials saw an economic opportunity and established contracts to sell ice in San Francisco. Ice production began in Sitka in 1851. ...
Dec 14, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Dec. 7
Rausistuaq (n); ARusistuaq (S) : Christmas Guangkuta ARusistuartaartukut January-mi. : We always celebrate Christmas in January. Many of Kodiak’s Alutiiq families celebrate Christmas twice each year: American Christmas on December 25 and Russian Orthodox Christmas on January 7. Although both events commemorate the birth of Christ, they are quite different. American Christmas features decorations, feasting, gift-gi...
Dec 07, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Nov. 30
KaRmauniaq (N), KaRmuuniaq (S) : Accordion_ Nick kaRmuuniartaartuq. : Nick (habitually) plays the accordion. In the mid-twentieth century, dances were popular events in Alutiiq communities, and many villages held weekly dances. Fridays were sock hop nights, because Saturday evenings were reserved for religious services. Other dances might be scheduled around community events. During the Second World War, for examp...
Nov 30, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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