Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
Alutiiq Word of the Week
 
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Photograph
Patreitaq (n); Patriitaq (S) - Photograph Patriitairnga. - Take a picture of me. The world’s first photographs were taken in the 1830s, when French scientist Louis Daguerre captured images on copperplates treated with silver and mercury. Twenty years later, in the 1850s, photography became popular in the United States with the invention of a less-expensive process that fixed images to glass or tin. As Americans sp...
Aug 02, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Jumper
Aq’alarluni - Jumper (as in a salmon) Aq’alartut iluani. - There are jumpers inside (the seine). Jumping salmon are a conspicuous sign of summer around Kodiak. Scan the surface of the ocean in June and you will see pink salmon hurling themselves out of the water as they head for their spawning grounds. Jumping is an adaptation that helps salmon clear obstacles as they move upstream. As fish near freshwater they be...
Jul 26, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Run
Qecengluni - Run Uswiillraraat cecengtaartut. - Kids are always running around. In classical Alutiiq society, runners passed important news from one village to the next. Elders recall young men running along the beach to carry messages to neighboring communities. When they arrived, a fresh runner would take the message to the next village, and in this way information would travel up the coast from community to com...
Jul 19, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Orca
Arlluk - Orca; Killer Whale Arllut kuimartut imarmi. - Orcas are swimming in the ocean. The orca or killer whale (Orcinus orca) is the largest member of the dolphin family. These large, toothed sea mammals are aggressive hunters known for their feeding habits. In addition to fish and squid, killer whales will eat other whales, sea lions, seals, and even birds. Adult orcas grow to between twenty-three and twenty-se...
Jul 12, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Laptuuk
Laptuuk : Baseball Kiagmi laptuugtaartukut. : We play baseball in the summertime. In classical Alutiiq society, community gatherings were an opportunity for games, particularly those played outdoors. Both men and women enjoyed participating in athletic challenges, including everything from swimming, boating and running races to wrestling, high jumping, target throwing and team sports. Competitions were a way to sh...
Jul 05, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 30 30 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Barrel
Puuc’kaaq : Barrel Puuc’kaat saRayami et’ut. : The barrels are in the shed. The Alutiiq word for barrel — puuc’kaaq — comes from the Russian word bochka, also meaning barrel. This link reflects the use of barrels for bulk storage on sailing ships in the early historic era. Russian traders imported grain, beads, and many other commodities to Alaska in wood barrels. Assembled from wooden staves bound with a series o...
Jun 28, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 31 31 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Bait
Narya’aq : Bait Iqsaka naryaaliaqa. : I baited my hook. We often think of bait as something fishermen use on hooks to catch fish or in pots to lure crabs, but Alutiiq hunters once used bait to capture birds. In Prince William Sound, hunters placed sinew nooses on the surface of the water, filled the centers with tempting pieces of crushed clam, and then made gull noises to attract diving birds. A quick tug on the ...
Jun 21, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 32 32 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Gold
Suulutaaq : Gold Kulutka suulutanek canamauq. : My ring is made of gold. The bedrock underlying the Kodiak Archipelago formed about seventy million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period. Geologists believe that Kodiak’s slates and greywackes developed on the South Pacific sea floor before rafting north on the earth’s crust to their current location. During this process, deposits of quartz were literally squi...
Jun 14, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 40 40 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Son-in-law
Nengauwaq : Son-in-law Gui nengauwangq’rtua. : I have a son–in-law. Alutiiqs use the term nengau’aq in a variety of ways. In some communities, it specifically means a son-in-law: the man who married your daughter. In others, the word is a general term for any man related by marriage. Whatever they are called, Alutiiq men know that when they marry an Alutiiq woman, they marry her family. The extended family is extr...
Jun 07, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Seine net
Kugyasiq; Kugu'asiq : Seine Net PaRaguutat kugyasinek aturtaartut. : The boats use seine nets. A seine is a weighted fishing net, designed to hang vertically in the water. Seines are among the fishing gear Alutiiqs have used to capture salmon for millennia. Historic accounts indicate that Alutiiq people wove their seines from animal sinew and attached bark floats and stone sinkers: ancient versions of the cork and...
May 31, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Search Our Marketplace
or Search by category