Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
Alutiiq Word of the Week
 
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Shuyak Island
Suu’aq; Suyaraq - Shuyak Island Anchorage-mek tai’akamta plane-gun Suu’aq tang’rtaarpet. - When we come from Anchorage by plane, we can see Shuyak Island. Shuyak Island, the seventh-largest of the Kodiak islands, covers sixty-nine square miles at the northern end of the archipelago. Just twelve miles long and eleven miles wide, this small island features a lush blanket of spruce forest and hundreds of small lakes....
Dec 06, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Cip’ausngasqaq
Cip’ausngasqaq - Show Off; Smart Aleck Awaqutan cip’ausngauq. - Your son is a smart aleck. In the Alutiiq language, the word cip’ausngasqaq translates literally as a “know it all” or a “smart aleck,” and people use the term to refer to someone who thinks of himself as a big shot. Among Alutiiqs, behaving like a big shot can be dangerous. Boasting is not only bad manners, it can poison your luck. A boastful hunter ...
Nov 29, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Kettle
Cainiik - Kettle Cainiik kallaqsiituq. - The kettle didn’t boil yet. Drinking tea, a favorite pastime in Alutiiq households, has ancient roots. Alutiiqs have long steeped medicinal plants in hot water to create healing infusions. In the nineteenth century, Alutiiqs began drinking black tea obtained in trade from Russian colonists. With European tea came a variety of teapots, cups, saucers, and samovars. Samovars a...
Nov 22, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Cold
Pat’snarluni - Cold Uksumi pat’snartaartuq. - It is always cold in the winter. The Kodiak Archipelago lies in a maritime environment. Despite the region’s northern latitude, encircling ocean waters and prevailing weather keep air temperatures mild by Alaska standards. At sea level, Kodiak’s temperatures typically range from 40° to 60° Fahrenheit (4.4°–15.6° Celsius) in summer and hover around freezing (32° Fahrenh...
Nov 15, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Yuwaluni
Niuwaluni; Yuwaluni - Talk (continuously) Alutiit’stun niuwaneq pingaktaaqa. - I like to talk the Alutiiq language. The Alutiiq language, the indigenous language of the Kodiak Archipelago, is known as Sugt’stun, which literally means “to speak like a person.” Although there are just a few handfuls of fluent Sugt’stun speakers in the Kodiak region today, Alutiiqs know that in any language, words can impact the worl...
Nov 08, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Arctic Entry
Siinaq - Kellidoor; Arctic Entry Cuumi, siinami taangapet puckaani et’aallriit. - Before, in the kellidor we kept our water in barrels. In northern climates where people rely on heavy clothing, stored foods, and sophisticated technologies for survival, storing one’s supplies is always a concern. Northern peoples manage this problem by creating special storage areas in their homes. In addition to piling supplies al...
Nov 01, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Wolf
Kaganaq - Wolf Kaganat yaksigtut maaken. - The wolves are far from here. Wolves (Canis lupus) occur throughout mainland Alaska, from the rainforests of Southeast to Unimak Island in the Aleutians and as far north as the Arctic coast of the Beaufort Sea. This huge range, nearly 85 percent of Alaska, illustrates the animals’ great adaptability. Like people, wolves can exist in many different habitats. Although wolve...
Oct 25, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Kindling
ARastaup’kaat (N); ARastuup’kaat (S) - Kindling (plural) Unuarpak angli aRastuup'kaalillianga. - This morning, I made a lot of kindling. Starting a fire in wet, windy Kodiak requires skill and help from some good tinder. Alutiiq families use a variety of natural materials to capture a flame. In forested parts of the archipelago, the small, dead lower branches of spruce trees stay dry in the rain. They are easy to ...
Oct 18, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Hammer
Mulut’uuk; Murut’uuk - Hammer Allrani mulut’uuq atu’akamgu aigaqa mulut’uurtaaqa. - Sometimes when I use the hammer I hit my hand. Before the availability of iron tools, Alutiiq people fashioned hammers from hard stones. They collected greywacke and granite cobbles from Kodiak beaches for help with chipping, pounding, and splitting jobs. Small hand-sized stones with pitted sides and ends illustrate the use of hamm...
Oct 11, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Window
Gaaleq – Window PatRiitaq inimauq gaalem caniani. - The picture is hanging next to the window. Alutiiq sod houses, ciqlluat, were dark inside. Their thick wood-planked roofs, covered with sod, grass, and boards, were designed to be waterproof and therefore let in little light. Most houses had a smoke hole — a square, board-covered hatch in the ceiling that could be propped open to release smoke from a fireplace be...
Oct 04, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 25 25 recommendations | email to a friend
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