Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Paulaq
Paulaq; Peluq – Ash Paulartuu'uq plit'aami. – There are lots of ashes in the stove. The Alutiiq word for ash — paulaq orpeluq — usually refers to wood ash. This is the fine, grey sediment found in the bottom of a fire pit or a wood burning stove after a hot fire. Cleaning the wood ash out of the household stove was a common task in decades past, before Alutiiq families adopted oil burning and electric stoves. Wood...
Mar 28, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Eprirturluni, P’rirca’iluni
Eprirturluni, P’rirca’iluni — Clean; Cleanse Plit’aaq p’rirca’iru. — Clean the stove. In classical Alutiiq society, house cleaning was both a daily activity and a scheduled spring event. Historic sources and the accounts of Elders indicate that people swept their sod houses with brooms made of eagle wings and covered their floors with clean, dry grass. Alutiiqs also restuffed their mattresses with dry grass, organ...
Mar 21, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Tanqigya’arluni – Dawn
Tanqigya’arluni – Dawn (verb) Tanqigyaturtuq. – It is starting to dawn. Dawn is the period of early morning twilight that begins as the sun nears the horizon, lifting its leading edge into the sky. The appearance of first morning light around Kodiak changes with the seasons. In summer dawn comes early and rapidly, as the sun rises high above the horizon filling the sky with strong, direct light for many hours. By ...
Mar 14, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Ilangcarluku
– Discipline; Lecture Tuyum llangcaraa. – The chief is lecturing him. Historic sources agree that there was little crime in Alutiiq villages before the 1950s. Detailed rules managed both the ownership and inheritance of personal property and the use of prime fishing and hunting locations. Similarly, customs governing the distribution of food ensured that anyone who needed meat or fish could share in the catch or t...
Mar 07, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: IRafkuruaq
IRafkuruaq; IRafkungcuk; WiRufkuruaq – String; Twine IRafkuruanek initalitallriit. – They used string to make clotheslines. String games like cats cradle are a popular pastime around the globe. From Australia to Asia, Africa, North America, and the high Arctic, people have long used a simple loop of string and their fingers to make designs. The function of these figures varies by culture. In some societies, string...
Feb 28, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Acupressurist
Caugnga’istaq – Acupressurist Una arnaq caugnga’istaq. – This woman is an acupressurist. Although many people think of acupressure as an Asian science, healers in societies around the world use their hands to restore health to the sick by applying gentle, carefully directed pressure. This pressure promotes blood circulation, stimulates the production of hormones, relieves tension, and reduces pain, helping the bod...
Feb 14, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 26 26 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Pingayun
Pingayun – Three Pingayunek carliangq’rtua. – I have three children. Counting is a skill that children around the world learn at a very young age, and although quantifying objects comes naturally to humans, the world’s societies count in many different ways. Counting systems reflect the mathematical concepts of a culture, which are influenced by language, social practices, worldviews, and even subsistence activiti...
Feb 07, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Angqiarlluni
Angqiarlluni — Injury; Hurt (suddenly) Paluqakamta angqiartaartukut. — When we fall down we injure ourselves. In classical Alutiiq society, two types of healthcare providers treated the sick and injured: healers trained in the arts of acupressure, bleeding, midwifery, and the use of medicinal herbs; and shamans who sought spiritual causes for illness and restored health by identifying and appeasing angered spirits...
Jan 31, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Blood
Auk – Blood Ilait auk aliktaarait. – Some people are scared of blood. In English, the word “blood” has several meanings. It can refer to the liquid that circulates oxygen and nutrients through an animal’s body, or it can denote a person’s family background — their ancestry. In the United States, the federal government uses this second meaning to identify Native people for the purposes of implementing laws and prov...
Jan 24, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Alphabet
Aapit; Aapitniiq – Alphabet Nutaan Alutiit aapit liitapet. – Now we are learning the Alutiiq alphabet. An alphabet is a system of characters used to represent the sounds in a language. By seeing a character, a reader can reproduce a sound without hearing it. In essence, alphabets store sounds. There are different kinds of alphabets. English speakers use the Latin alphabet, a phonemic alphabet that represents sound...
Jan 17, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend
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