Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
Alutiiq Word of the Week
 
Alutiiq Word of the Week:
Nagaayuq - Refuge Rock; Fortress Nagaayuq Ikani et’uq. - There is a refuge rock over there. To protect their families from raiders, Alutiiqs built temporary settlements at the top of precipitous cliffs and small, rocky, cliff-bound islands. These strategically located refuges were designed to repel attackers. Here, families prepared shelters and stockpiled supplies. When communities feared aggression, they retreat...
Aug 15, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Cimiyuq - Trade; Exchange
Cimigiuq; Cimiyuq - Trade; Exchange Suuget cimiutut. - People are trading. Alutiiq communities obtained resources and formed alliances by exchanging foods and raw materials. In good weather, people traveled by skin boat to neighboring communities to share their surplus goods and barter for items. Trade with the Alaska mainland was particularly important. Here, Kodiak Islanders could obtain resources not locally av...
Aug 08, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Naut'staat - Plants
Naut'staat - Plants Ilait naut'staat yaatutaartut. - Some plants are poisonous. Kodiak Island is often called Alaska's Emerald Isle, a nickname that reflects its thick carpet of green summer plants. Abundant rain, mild temperatures, and long summer days combine to make the region's mountains and meadows exceptionally productive for plant growth. There are about 650 known species of vascular plants in the archipela...
Jul 11, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Carwaq - Current
Carwaq - Current Carwaq tukniuq. - The current is strong. Perched on the edge of the continental shelf, the Kodiak Archipelago lies in the path of the Alaska current. Driven by wind and freshwater, this warm oceanic flow courses out of the central Pacific and circulates counterclockwise along the Gulf of Alaska’s coast. This current, and Alaska’s high coastal mountains, shield the gulf from the cold climate of Ala...
Jul 04, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Unganuuk – Uganik Island
Unganuuk – Uganik Island Gui ataaqa Unganuuni suullria. – My father was born at Uganik Island. Uganik Island is a large, mountainous landmass on the western coast of the Kodiak Archipelago. It is the eighth largest island in the Kodiak region, covering approximately fifty-seven square miles. The island trends northwest to southeast, forming the northern limit of the Uganik Bay region and creating the southern coas...
Jun 27, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Nunam Kalikaa
Nunam Kalikaa – Map Ikuk’gka kalikami. – I found it on the map. The Alutiiq word for map, nunam kalikaa, literally means “the land’s paper.” Although maps and marine charts are important to modern hunters and fishermen, they are recent navigational tools. For thousands of years, Alutiiq people stored information about the landscape in place names and stories. Eighteenth-century Russian fur traders made the first m...
Jun 20, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Lapaat’kaaq – Shovel
Lapaat’kaaq – Shovel Kiagmi lapaat’kaat aturtaarait uk’uruutateng asircarluki. – In the summer they use shovels to fix up their gardens. Digging tools were important in classical Alutiiq society, both for subsistence activities and for construction. Men and women used long, pointed pieces of whalebone to dig clams from the beach and unearth the roots of plants used for food and medicine. Alutiiqs also fashioned sh...
Jun 13, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week: NaRaciik (S) – Boat Captain
NaRiaciik (N); NaRaciik (S) – Boat Captain Kugyasigtaangama naRaciyutaallianga. – When I was fishing (seining), I used to be a captain. The Alutiiq word for boat captain, naRiaciikor naRaciik, comes from Russian. It includes a small capital R to indicate an “r“ sound, as in the English word run. While this sound is common in English and Russian words, it is absent in Alutiiq. Despite the recent origins of the word...
Jun 06, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq word of the week: Cukiq – Thorn; Sliver
Ckiq – Thorn; Sliver Allrani aigaqa cukirtaartuq. – Sometimes I get a sliver on my hand. The Alutiiq word for thorn, cukiq, can be used to mean sliver, thorn, barb, quill, or even spruce needle, and the word for the prickly devil’s club, cukilanarpak, means “plant with big thorns.” When northern European peoples immigrated to Kodiak in the late 1800s, it is likely they introduced a unique woodworking style known a...
May 30, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Alutiiq Word of the Week Lesson 16:47 
Itgaq (Literally, “foot”) – Flipper Gui wiinam itgai pingaktaanka. – I always like the sea lion’s feet. Sea mammals propel themselves through Alaska’s coastal waters with strong, sleek flippers. Flippers not only help animals swim, they can be important tools for exiting the water and moving on land. Seal and sea lion flippers, for example, have a tough rubbery surface that keeps the animal from sliding on slipper...
May 23, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Search Our Marketplace
or Search by category