Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Angqiarlluni
Angqiarlluni — Injury; Hurt (suddenly) Paluqakamta angqiartaartukut. — When we fall down we injure ourselves. In classical Alutiiq society, two types of healthcare providers treated the sick and injured: healers trained in the arts of acupressure, bleeding, midwifery, and the use of medicinal herbs; and shamans who sought spiritual causes for illness and restored health by identifying and appeasing angered spirits...
Jan 31, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Blood
Auk – Blood Ilait auk aliktaarait. – Some people are scared of blood. In English, the word “blood” has several meanings. It can refer to the liquid that circulates oxygen and nutrients through an animal’s body, or it can denote a person’s family background — their ancestry. In the United States, the federal government uses this second meaning to identify Native people for the purposes of implementing laws and prov...
Jan 24, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Alphabet
Aapit; Aapitniiq – Alphabet Nutaan Alutiit aapit liitapet. – Now we are learning the Alutiiq alphabet. An alphabet is a system of characters used to represent the sounds in a language. By seeing a character, a reader can reproduce a sound without hearing it. In essence, alphabets store sounds. There are different kinds of alphabets. English speakers use the Latin alphabet, a phonemic alphabet that represents sound...
Jan 17, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Danger
Uluranaq – Danger TRaapat allrani uluranartaartut. – Ladders are always dangerous. Danger is a recurring theme in the modern place names of the Kodiak Archipelago. Terror Bay, Stormy Point, Tombstone Rocks, Dark Passage, Dangerous Cape, Shark Point, Deadman Bay, and Danger Bay are some of the place names that have made their way to modern maps to warn travelers of hazards, persistent bad weather, and even past dis...
Jan 10, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Head
Nasquq - Head Nasquqa allrani anq’rtaartuq. - My head sometimes hurts. Covering the head is an important part of staying warm in cold, wet, or windy conditions, like those found on Kodiak. Alutiiq people designed a great variety of hats to protect their heads and retain heat. Unlike the skin clothing of far northern Alaska, Alutiiq parkas did not include a hood. People wore long robes with a short, loose-fitting, ...
Jan 03, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Ice Skate
Kungkiq; Kankiiq - Ice Skate Cuumi kungkirtaallianga unuk nangpiarluku iraluwakan. - Before, I used to ice skate all night sometimes when the moon was out. By December, many of Kodiak’s small ponds frozen strong enough to support ice skaters. Alutiiq Elders recall the joy of skating. As youths, many had homemade ice skates made from evaporated milk cans. Flatten the cans, tie them to your shoes, and away you go, s...
Dec 27, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Russian
Kasaakaq — Russian Cuumi Kasaakat Sun’ami amlerta’umallriit. — Before in Kodiak there were (reportedly) a lot of Russians. The Russian era in Alaska began in the early 18th century when explorers and traders sailed east from Siberia in search of new lands and resources. In addition to a wealth of sea mammals, fish, and birds, Russian colonists found Native people: a source of skilled labor for harvesting this boun...
Dec 20, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Hunter
Pisurta - Hunter Taugna suk pisurta. - This person is a hunter. The Alutiiq word pisurta translates literally as “one who hunts.” Hunting has always been essential to life on Kodiak, a way to procure not only food but many of the raw materials of daily living: animal skins for clothing and boat coverings, gut for waterproof rain gear and containers, bone and antler for tools, and whiskers, claws, teeth, and hair f...
Dec 13, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Shuyak Island
Suu’aq; Suyaraq - Shuyak Island Anchorage-mek tai’akamta plane-gun Suu’aq tang’rtaarpet. - When we come from Anchorage by plane, we can see Shuyak Island. Shuyak Island, the seventh-largest of the Kodiak islands, covers sixty-nine square miles at the northern end of the archipelago. Just twelve miles long and eleven miles wide, this small island features a lush blanket of spruce forest and hundreds of small lakes....
Dec 06, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Cip’ausngasqaq
Cip’ausngasqaq - Show Off; Smart Aleck Awaqutan cip’ausngauq. - Your son is a smart aleck. In the Alutiiq language, the word cip’ausngasqaq translates literally as a “know it all” or a “smart aleck,” and people use the term to refer to someone who thinks of himself as a big shot. Among Alutiiqs, behaving like a big shot can be dangerous. Boasting is not only bad manners, it can poison your luck. A boastful hunter ...
Nov 29, 2013 | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend
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