Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
Alutiiq Word of the Week
 
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Willow
Uqgwingcut or Nimruyaq: Willow Nimruyat nautaartut nunami: Willows always grow on the land. There are more than 50 species of willow (Salix spp.) in Alaska. One botanist estimates that 17 of these species can be found in the Kodiak region. Although most Alaska willows are shrub-sized plants, northern species can range in size from dwarf bushes to full-sized tress. Willows thrive in moist soils, particularly along ...
May 18, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Uncle
Angaq: Uncle Angaqa kanagtuuq: My uncle is tall. Alutiiq people reckon descent bilaterally. This means that children trace their ancestry equally through their mother’s and father’s lineages. A child is recognized as belonging to both sides of his or her family. While Alutiiqs share this practice with the Yup’ik, Iñupiaq and Inuit societies of northern Alaska and Canada, they are unique in the Gulf of Alaska. Neig...
May 11, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - Skiff
Skiigwaq or TuuRaq: Skiff TuuRaliguanga: I am building a skiff. Before the availability of aluminum skiffs and powerful motors and winches, Alutiiq fishermen relied on wooden dories and their own physical strength to harvest salmon. Setnetting, beach seining and ocean seining were done with high-sided, flat-bottomed skiffs propelled by rowing. These skiffs appeared in the late 19th century, during the first years ...
May 04, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - April 20, 2012
Qikarlluk: Sinew  Qikarllut tuknirtaartut:  Sinew is strong. Sinew is a fibrous, inelastic tissue that comes from the tendons and ligaments of animals. Bands, cords and sheets of this white material connect muscles with bones and support internal organs. Alutiiq people once harvested sinew from a variety of mammals, although the long, strong tendons of bears, whales, and porpoises were particularly coveted. Seamst...
Apr 20, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - April 6, 2012
Suumacirpet: Subsistence Suumacirpet asirpiatuq: Our way of living is the best. There is no easy way to translate the word “subsistence” into the Alutiiq language. Westerners often think of subsistence as the process of obtaining and eating wild foods, an alternative to buying groceries. This definition, however, fails to capture the complexities of living off the land.  To the Alutiiq people, subsistence is life....
Apr 06, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - March 30, 2012
Alas’kaaq: Alaska Guangkuta Alas’kaarmiu’at: We are All Alaskans. Unangan, the Native language of the Aleutian Island chain, is the source of the name Alaska. In Unangan, Alayeksa means “great land” or “mainland.” Before western conquest, Aleutian Islanders used this word to refer to the western end of the Alaska Peninsula. From their island perspective, the peninsula was an enormous land. Early western explorers ...
Mar 30, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - March 23, 2012
Kangiyaq: Kaguyak Ilaten Kangiyagmiu’at: Your relatives are from Kaguyak. The village of Kaguyak lies on the Aliulik Peninsula at the head of Kodiak Island’s Kaguyak Bay. Today, this once-flourishing coastal village is overgrown with brush and few remnants of its habitation remain. The fourth tidal wave generated by the Great Alaska Earthquake flattened the village in 1964 and killed two of its residents. Kaguyak ...
Mar 23, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Amutaq: Cod
Amutaq : Cod  Amutarsurqutartut.: They are going to get some cod Pacific cod or grey cod (Gadus marcocephalus) is an abundant, bottom-dwelling, round fish found widely in the Gulf of Alaska. These fast-growing, schooling fish are highly mobile. Cod winter in deep waters along the upper slope of the continental shelf, where they spawn. In spring they migrate to shallower nearshore waters, where they feed through th...
Mar 16, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - March 9, 2012
Quta: Beach Arnat qutmi et’ut: The women are at the beach. The place where the ocean meets the land is a diverse, productive environment, close to many resources. From the first occupation of the Kodiak Archipelago, Alutiiq families took advantage of this environment, building their homes behind quiet beaches where they could launch boats, harvest shoreline foods, and watch for sea mammals. Today, the beach remain...
Mar 09, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - Limpet
Sawak’iitaq; Spuungqulaq: Limpet Suupaligua Sawak’iitanek: I am making soup from limpets. Limpets (Lottia spp.) are among the intertidal organisms that encrust the rocky shores of Kodiak. The archipelago is home to a variety of these small invertebrates: the keyhole limpet, the tortoiseshell limpet and others. Limpets are grazing animals that form distinctive cone-shaped shells. They feed on algae by moving slowly...
Mar 02, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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