Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
Alutiiq Word of the Week - March 9, 2012
Quta: Beach Arnat qutmi et’ut: The women are at the beach. The place where the ocean meets the land is a diverse, productive environment, close to many resources. From the first occupation of the Kodiak Archipelago, Alutiiq families took advantage of this environment, building their homes behind quiet beaches where they could launch boats, harvest shoreline foods, and watch for sea mammals. Today, the beach remain...
Mar 09, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - Limpet
Sawak’iitaq; Spuungqulaq: Limpet Suupaligua Sawak’iitanek: I am making soup from limpets. Limpets (Lottia spp.) are among the intertidal organisms that encrust the rocky shores of Kodiak. The archipelago is home to a variety of these small invertebrates: the keyhole limpet, the tortoiseshell limpet and others. Limpets are grazing animals that form distinctive cone-shaped shells. They feed on algae by moving slowly...
Mar 02, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - Feb. 24, 2012
Ukanumk: Chirikof Island Ukamuk yaqsigtuq gwaken: Chirikof Island is far from here. Chirikof is an isolated, windy island at the far southern end of the Kodiak Archipelago. This 11-mile long, pear-shaped piece of land lies about 100 miles southwest of Kodiak Island. Archaeological data indicate the island has long been a crossroads, a place where Alutiiq and Aleut people visited for over 4,000 years. An Alutiiq st...
Feb 24, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - Feb. 17, 2012
Maqaq: The Dice Game Kita! Maqarlinuk: Come on! Let’s play dice. Dice games are common across North America. Native societies from New England to the Pacific Northwest enjoy tossing small objects in games of chance. Russian traders recorded an Alutiiq dice game they called stopka, where players tossed a small figurine carved of bone and scored points based on how it landed. Archaeological finds illustrate that the...
Feb 17, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - Feb. 10, 2012
Ciguutkaaq: Tuberculosis. Ciguutkaara: She has tuberculosis.   Known as TB or consumption, tuberculosis once ranked among the most deadly diseases in the world. Caused by the tubercle bacilli bacteria, tuberculosis often infects the lungs and spreads to other parts of the body. People typically get the disease by breathing in the bacteria. After the initial infection, TB can lie dormant for years. The first sympto...
Feb 10, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq word of the week - Feb. 2, 2012
Nunakuarluni: Walk overland Nunakuartuq Kal’unun: He is walking to Karluk. Before airplanes and motorized boats, Alutiiq families often traveled by foot. Walking long distances was an activity people accepted and enjoyed. Travelers crossed rivers and mountains to visit family and friends, to move to and from hunting and fishing camps, to trade with neighbors, or to access seasonal jobs. Some travelers followed wel...
Feb 03, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week- Jan. 27, 2012
Kinguk: Worm/Insect Tawa’i kiugurturninaitua: No, I wont eat this worm! Earthworms are relatively rare in Alaska. Despite the abundance and notoriety of their cousin the ice worm, earthworms do not thrive in acidic forest soils or in areas with extensively frozen ground. Of the 1,800 known species of earthworms, the only naturally occurring Alaska species is Bismastos tenuis, one of the world’s smaller earthworms....
Jan 27, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Pipe
TRuup’kaaq/Pa’ipaaq: Pipe  Ata tRuup’kaaq: Let’s see the pipe. Although tobacco was popular in the historic era, smoking tobacco was not. Historic sources indicate that Alutiiq people preferred to create snuff by adding tobacco to a mixture of wood ash, black tea and dried crushed nettle leaves. This produced iqmik, a substance held in the mouth. Smoking tobacco gained popularity later, perhaps in the last decades...
Jan 20, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq word of the week
Glepaq (Northern); Lliipaq (Southern); Gliipaq: Bread  Glepaliqutartua: I am going to make bread. Bread came to Kodiak with Russian traders, who imported flour and knowledge of baking. Yet baked goods appear to have been a luxury item in the early historic era. Historic accounts suggest that bread was in short supply, due to limited quantities of flour. Russian attempts to grow wheat and rye in Kodiak’s wet climat...
Jan 13, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - Jan. 6
Aula’aq (northern dialect), Arula’aq (southern dialect): Bigfoot Arula’at tang’rngutaakait cuumi: They used to see bigfoot before. Stories of bigfoot creatures — hairy, man-like beings that live in the wilderness — are common in the Kodiak Archipelago and Prince William Sound. Alutiiq people call these beings aula’aq or arula’aq, which means to run away. Some say these creatures are half human and half beast; othe...
Jan 06, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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