Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
 
Alutiiq word of the week - Feb. 2, 2012
Nunakuarluni: Walk overland Nunakuartuq Kal’unun: He is walking to Karluk. Before airplanes and motorized boats, Alutiiq families often traveled by foot. Walking long distances was an activity people accepted and enjoyed. Travelers crossed rivers and mountains to visit family and friends, to move to and from hunting and fishing camps, to trade with neighbors, or to access seasonal jobs. Some travelers followed wel...
Feb 03, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week- Jan. 27, 2012
Kinguk: Worm/Insect Tawa’i kiugurturninaitua: No, I wont eat this worm! Earthworms are relatively rare in Alaska. Despite the abundance and notoriety of their cousin the ice worm, earthworms do not thrive in acidic forest soils or in areas with extensively frozen ground. Of the 1,800 known species of earthworms, the only naturally occurring Alaska species is Bismastos tenuis, one of the world’s smaller earthworms....
Jan 27, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Pipe
TRuup’kaaq/Pa’ipaaq: Pipe  Ata tRuup’kaaq: Let’s see the pipe. Although tobacco was popular in the historic era, smoking tobacco was not. Historic sources indicate that Alutiiq people preferred to create snuff by adding tobacco to a mixture of wood ash, black tea and dried crushed nettle leaves. This produced iqmik, a substance held in the mouth. Smoking tobacco gained popularity later, perhaps in the last decades...
Jan 20, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq word of the week
Glepaq (Northern); Lliipaq (Southern); Gliipaq: Bread  Glepaliqutartua: I am going to make bread. Bread came to Kodiak with Russian traders, who imported flour and knowledge of baking. Yet baked goods appear to have been a luxury item in the early historic era. Historic accounts suggest that bread was in short supply, due to limited quantities of flour. Russian attempts to grow wheat and rye in Kodiak’s wet climat...
Jan 13, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week - Jan. 6
Aula’aq (northern dialect), Arula’aq (southern dialect): Bigfoot Arula’at tang’rngutaakait cuumi: They used to see bigfoot before. Stories of bigfoot creatures — hairy, man-like beings that live in the wilderness — are common in the Kodiak Archipelago and Prince William Sound. Alutiiq people call these beings aula’aq or arula’aq, which means to run away. Some say these creatures are half human and half beast; othe...
Jan 06, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq word of the week
Alayugluni/Alataq: Stingy Ilait Alatartaartut: Some of them are always stingy. Among the world’s hunting and gathering societies, sharing is a highly esteemed behavior. People who are fortunate enough to obtain food and raw materials are expected to share their luck with others. The practice redistributes resources among an interdependent group of people and ensures that those with different abilities have the nec...
Dec 30, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week
Kenirwik: Hearth (fire pit) Una kenirwik angsinartuq: The hearth is big. In the center of most Alutiiq sod houses, there was a stone-lined fireplace. In addition to heating and lighting the household, this hearth was a gathering place. People cooked around the hearth, repaired their tools, sewed clothing, and visited. In the evening, when families retired to small sleeping rooms, guests and single adults remained ...
Dec 23, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week — Eye
Ingaalaq: Eye Isiik iingalartutaartut: Owls have big eyes. An Alutiiq story from Prince William Sound tells of a young man who wished to be married.  He traveled to a killer whale village, where he gave the chief dried halibut in return for the right to marry his daughter.  The daughter left with the young man, but discovered quickly that he had dirty, runny eyes.  Disgusted, she snuck away and returned to her mot...
Dec 16, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week
Urnaq: cradle   Urnamen carliaq lliiluku: Put the baby in the cradle. Finding a safe place for a baby to rest is always a concern. In classical Alutiiq society, mothers solved this problem by using cradle boards. Babies were tightly swaddled to cradle boards, which could be laid on the floor, stood in a corner or carried like a pack. A cradle board collected from the village of Nuchek in Prince William Sound featu...
Dec 09, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: "Fried bread"
Alatiq/Alaciq: fried bread Gwangkuta alacirturtaartukut: We always eat fried bread. Travel almost anywhere in Native America and you will find fried bread. This beloved food is a common addition to meals, a staple at celebrations, and a symbol of intertribal unity. Alutiiq communities are no exception. Fried bread is favorite food that is often found at gatherings, offered with holiday meals, and served to guests....
Dec 02, 2011 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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