Kodiak Daily Mirror - Daily newspaper of Kodiak, Alaska
  
Alutiiq Word of the Week
 
Alutiiq Word of the Week: Oct. 12
SaRayaq : Shed_ Tuntuq saRayami inimauq. : The reindeer is hanging in the shed. Outbuildings have been a part of Alutiiq communities for thousands of years. In studies of ancient Alutiiq settlements, archaeologists find smokehouses, storage sheds, and a variety of small structures that illustrate how people used the space outside their homes. Historic sources tell us that Alutiiq families also built small dwelling...
Oct 12, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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StRausiq (N), StRuusiq (S): Yeast.
StRausiq (N), StRuusiq (S): Yeast. StRausircunituq. : It smells like yeast.  Yeast is a single-celled microorganism, a type of fungus widely present in nature. There are thousands of varieties of yeast in air, soil, and water, and on plants and animals. Archaeologists believe that people began incorporating yeast into bread at least 5,000 years ago. In baking, yeast works by generating carbon dioxide as it breaks ...
Oct 05, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Kaasnaq : Government
Kaasnaq : Government / Government Person
Kasnam sua taikutartuq. : A government person is coming. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Kodiak’s rural villages maintained local governments led by a community chief. The chief was chosen from the adult male residents of each village by a traditional council that included a second chief, a church warden, a lay reader, and community Elders. Although the position ...
Sep 28, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Sept. 21
Pamana’rmiuq; Eskimuq; Pamanirmiu’aq :  Yup’ik Eskimos
Eskimut paagani et’aartut. : The Eskimos live way up there. Although the term Eskimo appears to have passed into English from the French word Eskimeaux, linguists believe that the word’s ultimate origin is in Montagnais, an Algonquian language spoken in the eastern Canadian provinces of Quebec and Labrador. The Montagnais used a similar-sounding word, meaning ...
Sep 21, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week: Qetgauwartaasqaq : Frog
Qetgauwartaasqaq : Frog, Toad
Qetgauwartaasqat allrani cungartaartut. : Frogs are sometimes green. The Alutiiq words for toad and frog are the same — qetgauwartaasqaq. This word literally means “thing always jumping.” Amphibians are rare in Alaska. The state’s naturally occurring herpetofauna includes just 6 species: two types of salamanders, one newt, two frogs, and one toad. Of these animals, only the wood frog ...
Sep 14, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week — Milk
Muluk’uuk (n); MuRuk’uuk (S) : Milk KuRuwamek muluk’uungtaartutkut. : We get milk from a cow.   Milk is a relatively recent addition to the Alutiiq diet, a fact illustrated by the Russian derivation of the Alutiiq words for milk. Although midwives brewed a tea from pineapple weed to stimulate the production of a new mother’s milk, and mothers nursed their babies for several years, cow’s milk was not widely used in...
Sep 07, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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Taryuq (S); sauliq (N) : Salt
Taryuq (S); sauliq (N) : Salt Taryurtuu’uq una iqalluk : This fish is salty. Salt is an effective preservative because it can dehydrate plant and animal tissues and limit the growth of bacteria. This mineral was a valuable commodity during Kodiak’s historic era because it was used to process both animal pelts and fish. Early traders imported most of their salt. Although salt can be boiled out of seawater, the extr...
Aug 24, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Kapuustaq: Sea Lettuce
Kapuustaq: Sea Lettuce Kapuustat cungartaartut: Sea lettuce (pl.) is always green The sea lettuce found in the Kodiak Archipelago (Ulva sp.) is a bright green, leafy, intertidal alga that thrives on rocky shores. This marine plant has smooth, transparent leaves with small holes that can grow up to a foot long. These leaves have a short stem, or stipe, that clings to rocks with a tough, fibrous hold on. This plant ...
Aug 17, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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Anwik: Monk’s Lagoon

Anwik: Monk’s Lagoon
 Apaangcuk Anwigmi et’aallria.: Father Herman lived at Monk’s Lagoon. Monk’s Lagoon is a tiny, tree-ringed cove at the southeastern end of Spruce Island, about fifteen miles north of Kodiak harbor. It is named for Father Herman, a beloved Russian Orthodox monk who established a hermitage there in 1818. Father Herman ran a small school and an orphanage in Monk’s Lagoon, where he is believed to ...
Aug 10, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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Alutiiq Word of the Week — Learned One
Lisngasqaq : Learned One
 Gui lisngasqaq Alutiit’stun. : I am learned in the Alutiiq language. The Alutiiq word lisngasqaq is a respectful term, used in reference to someone who is considered wise. You might use this word to talk about a teacher, a mentor, or an Elder with the ability to share valuable knowledge. For example, young adults who are currently learning the Alutiiq language by apprenticing to fluent El...
Aug 03, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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