The Coast Guard incident report is provided weekly by the public affairs staff of Coast Guard District 17.

July 31

• Medical personnel from the Haines Clinic called the Coast Guard requesting a medevac for motorcycle accident patient Sunday afternoon. Commercial services could not get in until civil twilight because the runway is not lit. An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew was launched out of Sitka, picked up the patient and transported her to emergency medical personnel.

• Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Anchorage command center received a call from Alaska State Troopers in Seldovia reporting the 21-foot pleasure craft Let’s Get Lost with three people onboard was taking on water in Kachemak Bay.

The watchstanders advised the pleasure craft crew to shoot a flare to alert vessels in the area to their position. The vessel had lost all battery power and the crew had only a cell phone for communication. The pleasure craft Prospector responded within 20 minutes and towed the Let’s Get Lost to Homer.

Aug. 1

• Sector Juneau received a call via VHF from the Alaska Marine Highway System ferry Kennicott reporting a 62-year-old man suffering from a possible heart attack. An Air Station Sitka MH-60 Jayhawk responded. The crew arrived on scene, hoisted the patient and safely returned to Sitka. The patient, in stable condition, was transferred to waiting emergency medical personnel.

• Under the authority of the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission, a law enforcement team from the Kodiak-based Coast Guard cutter Munro boarded a Taiwanese-flagged 72-foot tuna longliner targeting sharks.

The vessel’s master was cited for violations of conservation and management measures related to record keeping, seabird mitigation and retention of shark fins. The vessel has since returned to fishing, and responsibility for investigating the violations has been handed to the Taiwanese government.

Aug. 2

• While on patrol in the Pacific Ocean, the Kodiak-based Coast Guard cutter Munro discovered a 30-foot Japanese vessel unmanned and adrift. A Munro boarding team confirmed there were no signs of recent activity and reported the stern lines onboard tied off to cleats had been severed. The vessel was from Fukushima, Japan, based on documents onboard, last dated to November 2010.

Personnel at the Japanese search and rescue command center in Tokyo confirmed the vessel was abandoned and was a hazard to navigation. They also verified the owner had passed away in the March 2011 earthquake and the vessel had been set adrift by the tsunami.

With the approval of the Japanese search and rescue personnel, the crew of Munro subsequently sank the abandoned vessel Wednesday.

• Air Station Kodiak received a request from the Kodiak Brown Bear Center on Camp Island at Karluk Lake, 58 miles southwest of Kodiak city, for a medevac of a 58-year-old man suffering from gastrointestinal distress.

A Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter was launched from Kodiak and returned the man to the air station, from where he was taken to Providence Kodiak Island Medical Center in stable condition.

Aug. 3

Coast Guard Sector Anchorage watchstanders received a report from an employee onboard the Chevron platform Steelhead of an object resembling an overturned black life raft in Cook Inlet. It was too far from the platform for the employee to confirm if it was a life raft. Platform personnel sent their helicopter to take a closer look but could not relocate the object. Searches were conducted by an Air Station Kodiak HC-130 and a Civil Air Patrol plane with no signs of distress reported.

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