Sunday’s snowstorm dumped half a foot of snow on Kodiak, but according to long-term averages, it’s nothing but normal.

According to measurements taken by the National Weather Service Station at Kodiak State Airport, 2.1 inches of snow fell before midnight Saturday night. On Sunday, as snow continued off and on through the day, another 4.2 inches were recorded, generating a storm total of 6.3 inches.

Kodiak’s snow was part of a larger storm that draped southcentral Alaska in white. A winter storm warning was issued Sunday for Anchorage, which was expected to receive up to 18 inches of snow by this morning.

In Kodiak, which received only the edge of the storm, the accumulation was moderated by temperatures on the edge of freezing that melted the snow almost as fast as it fell.

While the snow came two days after the official start of spring, that isn’t unusual. Kodiak receives 11.3 inches of snow each March on average, and another 8 inches each average April. Even May receives two-tenths of an inch, on average.

While locals have considered this winter “mild,” in reality it’s close to average overall.

As of Monday afternoon, Kodiak has seen 59.9 inches of snowfall this winter, only 1.7 inches more than normal for this time of year. Last year, Kodiak had seen a near-record 138.5 inches of snow by March 25.

The weather service predicts mostly sunny skies through Tuesday night, when increasing cloudiness is expected to give way to a chance of rain and snow.

Contact the Mirror at editor@kodiakdailymirror.com.

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