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During the darkest days of Alaska’s winter, black-capped chickadees stuff themselves with enough seeds and frozen insects to survive 18-hour nights. Where the chickadees spend those long nights was a mystery until a biologist tracked them.

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On a certain weekday during each of the past 13 Decembers, I have settled into a chair at a long table, pulled out my notepad and listened to experts talk about the changes they have noticed north of the Arctic Circle.

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“On winter mornings, just as the sun’s uncertain light slopes across the Tanana Flats, ravens fly over my log cabin on their daily commute to town. Perhaps, like me, they would prefer to remain here in the hills above Fairbanks, where temperatures are usually ten or twenty degrees warmer. Bu…

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Ice that floats on far-north oceans has been dwindling the last few years. Scientists have described the shrinking of this solar reflector — once bigger than Russia and now taking up less space than Australia — as a breakdown of the world’s refrigerator.

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I am celebrating on a rainy November afternoon: For weeks I have been talking about the importance of participating in the democratic process and casting one’s vote despite the downfalls of the system.

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Will Harrison, who knew the world’s bumpy plains of ice as well as his old neighborhood in Saint John, New Brunswick, has died. He was 84.

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After years of writing this column about life in the ocean and environmental issues, and as a conversation and learning tool for anything ocean-related going on around our beautiful Island, I currently find it difficult to stay within the limits of this assignment.

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Biologist Stacia Backensto has fooled a raven. When trying to recapture birds on Alaska’s North Slope during her graduate student days at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, she wore a moustache and beard. She also strapped pillows to her waist.

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The season is changing again. This morning the roofs of the houses in my neighborhood were coated in frost, I had to warm up my car before I could see out the windows and there was a fresh layer of snow on the peaks of the mountains.

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On the first day of October, a little girl pulls on her rubber boots and rushes outside into crisp fall air. She knows the days are getting shorter, but she doesn’t realize Alaska is a week past the autumnal equinox.

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An 80-foot ship called the Island C, a great captain with a vision, an exceptional young cook, a competent and upbeat skiff operator, and an engineer with a wealth of experiences and stories to complement, two crew leaders, and a group of volunteers who work hard pulling together every day, …

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Kodiak is such an interesting place: If you look at a map of the United States, you are lucky if Alaska even shows up in its proper location and is not inserted somewhere off the coast of Mexico.

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When it comes to talking about elections, most people would say that they want to see change.

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I have recently been tasked with reviewing a paper about ecosystem dynamics in the North Atlantic Ocean. It has given me some appreciation of the difficult job of fisheries managers and the task of writing reports on the status of an ecosystem.

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Alaska’s landscape has an unusual feature that allows us to enjoy cheap bananas in Fairbanks and other things that make life better in the subarctic.

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“May you always have sand in your shoes and a shell in your pocket” read the text on a card a friend gave me a while ago. The card featured a mermaid; I like mermaids.

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A scientist recently wondered which animal travels farthest across the landscape in one year. In doing his research, he found a few Alaska creatures near the top of the list.

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When our mind seeks solutions to the problems of the day, it often takes a trip down memory lane. People remember things in different ways and often the memories are tied to certain items or images.

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High summer is here in middle Alaska. North of Fairbanks, in bright sunshine, alder flycatchers are perched in spruce tops, just arriving from Bolivia and Peru. A few steps away, accompanied by the smell of sulfur, dozens of carrion flies buzz on and above a moose carcass.

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This time will be remembered in history. What would I give for a glimpse into one of the future recounts of the changes that our country is in the process of and preparing to undergo?

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After the final steps of a long run in early March, Greg Finstad took his pulse rate. His heart was at 38 beats per minute. Perfect. The reindeer biologist and marathon runner was in top shape to run this year’s Boston Marathon.

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Imagine you were shut down in a small apartment in a high-riser in some city. You are not allowed to go outside, so to keep your sanity you begin to meditate.

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There is a great white shark in the fish tank with me. Well, not really, but this is the best metaphor I could come up with trying to translate the old saying “there is an elephant in the room” into a marine theme.

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Last night I went out for a drink with a couple of friends. As we arrived, the band was just leaving after playing for an empty room all evening and we had our choice of, well, all of the tables.

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On the cusp of Interior Alaska’s springtime, Melinda Webster will not experience it this year. She’ll miss most of summer, too. Webster will soon head north of Earth’s land masses, to spend the next half year cradled in ice.

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Nate Becker lives with his family on a quiet stretch of the Yukon River as it flows into Alaska. On a recent ski trip, I visited the Beckers’ home along with two geologist friends. Nate had a question for them.

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Today, I was woken up by the sounds of playing children. There is a lot of shouting and screaming involved, a lot of stomping of running feet, doors opening and slamming shut, and a lot of energy. As the kids were outside in the snow, I spent some time watching as they were totally engulfed …

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While skiing with two friends on the frozen Yukon River a few weeks ago, I visited the eight people who live between the towns of Eagle and Circle, which are 160 river miles apart.

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We just skied 100 miles of the frozen Yukon River, two friends and I, until it got too cold for our skis to glide, and we flew back to Fairbanks on a plane that landed on both skis and wheels.

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I consider myself an environmentalist. I have heard a lot of sneers and jokes about those “tree-huggers” and “animal lovers” who would rather save a bird than eat, rather look at a bunny in the forest than have a road built there to go faster to the next place of interest, rather have a fiel…

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Today, I am celebrating writing my 250th article for the Kodiak Daily Mirror. I started these contributions in 2008 with my first article titled “Mother and Father in one,” talking about shrimp. In the same year I also started the Kodiak Ocean Science Discovery Program to connect students an…

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When I was a kid there was a small convenience store located about a mile from my family home. Whenever I had gotten a hold of some money, I would walk there and spend it on candy, carefully doing the math to get the most “bang for the buck.” Sometimes my mom would send me to get an item tha…

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Many of us start each new year with plans to improve something about ourselves or the way we do things. I have lately been thinking about the seemingly impossible task of living in the present while being better at planning out the future. At the same time, I want to draw from fond experienc…

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Solstice and Christmas time give a chance for reflection. Around the holidays many people contemplate what the year has brought and what is coming up in the new year. Following the news stories, especially the environmental news can be daunting, sometimes make a person feel depressed, powerl…

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Last spring and summer, during the northward migration of the gray whales, the news kept reporting dead whales found washed up on beaches from California to Alaska. By July NOAA reported 182 gray whales were found dead along their migration route from the warmer waters in Baha California, Me…

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I was recently given a rare opportunity to see the diversity of fishes caught on last summer’s Bering Sea trawl survey. I had an unwieldy bag of frozen fish that it took me a while to sort through and two days to thaw out. I hauled two totes of these fish to Kodiak Middle School for an after…

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A person born in March of 1989 would now be 30 years, 8 months old. Roughly, you have to be at least 40 years old and have lived in, or had some connection to Alaska at the time to have any first-hand memories of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. 

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Last week, about 50 people got together in Kodiak to think about changes to come to our town. The title of the conference was “Adapt Kodiak” and it was one of a series of such conferences held in numerous Alaskan communities to spur the process of thinking about how to take change into consi…

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It is a dark and stormy morning. The wind makes noises in my chimney pipe and gusts are shaking the house. Occasional thumps from the roof tell of the spruce cones and branches that are falling onto the house. Outside, the trees are dancing wildly and the shadows of their moving branches are…

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I did one 10-day Marine Debris cleanup tour to the beaches of Shuyak in June, and I just returned from a second such adventure in Izhut Bay, Afognak Island. In June, we had a group of young people on their first work experience, a beautiful setting, and a lot of very hard manual labor. This …

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I hate to resolve to the shallowness of writing about the weather. By now everyone must have noticed that we are having an unusually warm, extremely dry summer. But I may be wrong: Just the other day, as I left a store the cashier told me to “enjoy the nice weather.” There is nothing nice ab…