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In 2017 we spent a month in southeast Australia. One weekend, we drove from Melbourne south to the Mornington Peninsula, home to historic Heronswood Gardens. The grounds are world-famous, for its Fork to Fork restaurant, and for its status as the first public garden in Australia to be certif…

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Clock time is a human invention. Unlike natural time, like the rotation of the earth and a leaf flowing down a river. Still, it’s August and we can’t help but notice that the sun rises and sets on a different notch in the trees now, compared to June. During August, we will lose 2.3 hours of …

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KODIAK — Do you remember the song “Edelweiss” from the “The Sound of Music?” Written by Rodgers and Hammerstein, “Edelweiss” turned out to be one of the most beloved songs in the musical.

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KODIAK - This time of year, you can see them standing alongside our roads. Out-of-towners gesturing and aiming their smartphones over fences and at sides of buildings. Listen carefully and you might hear comments that go something like this:

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KODIAK — It is Independence Day tomorrow, and the senior center will be celebrating with the Annual Stan and Nita Nelson BBQ.  Each year on this holiday, we celebrate the Nelsons with a holiday BBQ to honor them for donating part of their estate to the center’s endowment fund. 

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KODIAK — Orange hawkweed is not just a pretty flower. It’s terrorizing home gardens and wild spaces from Alberta and Alaska to Oregon and Australia. 

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KODIAK — Marty picked rhubarb the other day and carried the tote full of trimmed stalks to the front door. “The plants are really healthy and big this year,” he said jubilantly. “But so are the slugs.”

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KODIAK — I stood on the lawn near the compost bins and faced a group of summer school students. They were on a field trip from Main Elementary School to learn what makes good garden soil.

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KODIAK — Michael Jordan knows a thing or two about winning and losing. “I’ve missed more than 9,000 shots in my career,” he says. “I’ve lost almost 300 games. Twenty-six times I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And…

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KODIAK — Most folks know rhododendrons as big, leathery-leafed shrubs with rounded clusters (called trusses) of stunning white, yellow, pink, red or purple blossoms. But there are also dwarfs a few inches high, such as our dark pink Kamchatka Rhododendron, which thrives on rocky alpine areas…

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KODIAK — Bedding plants are making a colorful splash at local retailers. That, plus the appearance of salmonberry blossoms and longer days, signals the beginning of the gardening season. Before you transplant those tender seedlings outside though, remember this: While you might enjoy a warm,…

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KODIAK — Don’t you just love wiggling your toes in soft, green grass? Me, too — until the day I went to a park and watched some kids playing Frisbee. They leaped high to snatch the Frisbee and then touched down on the grass. Barefoot. I cringed because I knew the lawn had been treated with c…

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KODIAK — It feels odd to be writing about snow in April. After all, it is spring, verified by the fact that we are now experiencing 15 hours of daylight. I guess that means that any snow will melt more quickly, right? 

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KODIAK — Forcing plants in late winter is a fun way to get a head start on colorful flowers and fresh veggies. Forcing involves producing crops out of season through replicating the conditions necessary for plant growth. You might recall my description of forcing a poinsettia in a dark close…

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KODIAK — As we enter Thanksgiving week, I’d like to focus on a few ways we can make a difference to ourselves, our neighbors, our community and our gardens. In a second, I’ll share my all-time favorite pumpkin pie recipe. But I want to cover four easy projects we can accomplish whilst the we…

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KODIAK — I bumped into a friend the other day, next to a display of pumpkins that were on sale. “How’s your garden doing?” I asked. “Ready for winter?”

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KODIAK — I’m grateful that the cold weather has been slow in coming, because I’ve procrastinated a few garden chores. I planted my garlic and flowering bulbs, no problem. Kale and broccoli, no sweat. But all those green tomatoes that stubbornly refused to turn red, I put it off ’til the last…

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KODIAK — I love hiking through Ft. Abercrombie on blustery days when wind and rain animate the spruce trees. When I look up, I feel like I’m inside a giant hairbrush, watching the bristles wave around the sky.

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KODIAK — Darn, I have slugs in my hoophouse. I learned a trick for keeping them from chewing on my broccoli and beans, though. I feed them candy. Not a Snickers bar, but something tender and sweet to a slug: Bok choy. I allow them to eat on it to their heart’s (do slugs have hearts?) content…

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KODIAK - A few years ago, I hosted a photography workshop for a group of camera buffs from Poland, California, British Columbia, and Wisconsin. After the PowerPoint presentation, we spilled out to the garden. It didn’t take long for the group to notice the blue poppies blooming in the corner…

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The weather these past couple weeks has been cool, but it hasn’t dampened our spirits. During KMXT’s garden call-in show last week where I fielded questions, we had more questions than time to answer them. Plant spirits are very much alive, too. Primroses and salmonberries are blooming, rhub…

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Seeds. Such amazing things. Seeds provide not only food for us (rice, corn, wheat, oats, pecans), but symbols that have colored our language through time. We speak of seed money, the seed of an idea, and fishermen refer to young oysters used for transplanting as seed oysters. This week I’m c…

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After decorating the Christmas tree branches with lights and ornaments, I stepped back to critique my efforts. Call me a design geek, but immediately, I found “holes” am ong the branches, spaces calling for ornaments to fill the voids. But I’d used all my ornaments. The next best thing? Make…

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Better late than never. Last Monday was President’s Day. Friday came, and something got me thinking about Thomas Jefferson’s gardens at Monticello. Thomas Jefferson wasn’t just a gardener extraordinaire, he honestly liked to eat vegetables, which, he said, “constitute my principal diet.” His…

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With visions of hairnets and tater-tots in my mind, I was secretly excited about becoming the substitute lunch lady at St. Mary’s School. The regular lunch lady at St. Mary’s had resigned and several parents and myself members stepped up to fill the gap for the remainder of the year.

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Are you in or out? According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the average American spends 93 percent of their life indoors: 87 percent is spent inside buildings of some sort, then another 6 percent in automobiles. That’s only 7 percent of one’s entire life outdoors. Ouch.

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In many parts of the world, cleaning house is considered essential to starting the new year on the right foot. One Celtic tradition is to sweep floors from the outside of the room inward, which prevents any good energy from escaping out the front door. In China, cleaning house before Chinese…

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 Every year the Garden Media Group, based out of Pennsylvania, predicts trends that will impact our yards and gardens. The 2017 report titled “Grow 365” identifies gardening trends that range from clean, healthy living with fewer chemicals and more organic food to “soundscaping” with trees t…

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Seeds come as large as a coconut or as small as the dust-sized bits produced by begonias. Seeds provide more food for the human race than any other plant or animal. Far-fetched? All you have to do is think about the vast amounts of peanuts, rice, corn, wheat, oats, pecans and barley that we …

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During Saturday night’s Harbor Lights Festival, Marty joined the hundreds of Kodiak residents that ambled along the docks, enjoying the pleasant weather, bumping into neighbors, and looking for their favorite Christmasy boat.

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Anxious that you didn’t get your spring bulbs planted or your carrots pulled out of the ground? Worried about the state of the climate? Bracing for more winter? Sometimes all that’s needed to ease life’s challenges is some good comfort food. Whether it’s a big serving of soup, a piece of hot…

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Sweet potatoes and yams are two of my all-time favorite vegetables. (If I’m ever marooned on a deserted island, I pray these tubers accompany me.) Sweet potatoes and yams are not true potatoes. These tubers are members of the morning glory family, and as such prefer warm feet, unlike our tra…

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The Journey of Food is most pronounced during the holiday season. We wrestle with turkeys, shop for ingredients, and open cookbooks to pages stained with last year’s cranberry sauce. This season will see the greatest changes in our kitchen as we embrace a plant-based diet. Our new “no meat, …

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Though last weekend’s wind and rain made for less than stellar conditions for hosting an outdoor gardening workshop, a few intrepid souls stopped by our garden to learn about composting, mulching and growing hardy greens.

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The topic of weather and climate has been on the front tongue of many conversations lately. Not just here, but around the world. Friday’s Kodiak Daily Mirror for example, ran an article from Climate Central about warm temperatures slowing Arctic sea ice growth to a crawl, the slowest regrowt…

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Pumpkins take center stage in cooking and decorating applications (happy Halloween, by the way) during the fall season. It’s hard to miss the large totes of the large orange squashes in our local stores. As one of the most popular crops in the U.S., an amazing 1.5 billion pounds of pumpkins …

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On Oct. 17, China launched the Shenzhou, sending two astronauts into orbit to spend a month aboard the Tiangong 2, a space laboratory. As they zoom their way heavenward, I wonder what the Blue Planet looks like from space: Oceans, cities glowing at night, and mountains never before viewed fr…

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During fall harvest, we tend to favor megacrops like potatoes, onions, cucumbers, cabbage and tomatoes. They’re pantry and canning jar fillers, for sure. On the other hand, smaller-stature plants such as parsley, calendula, dill and other herbs we often overlook. While they don’t fill cannin…

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Seed catalogs say “sweeter after a frost” when describing winter vegetables. It’s true. As I explained last week, vegetables like kale, Brussels sprouts, leeks, carrots and cabbage all taste sweeter after a frost or two. This characteristic of hardy vegetables is one of the many advantages o…

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If you’ve ever thought that plants are quite separate from us or that they’re inanimate objects, then I invite you to read this tribute by Peter Loewen, author of many delightful books, including “Jefferson’s Garden,” “Bringing the Outdoors In,” and my favorite, “Seeds: The Definitive Guide …

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Before corporate seed companies arrived on the scene, seeds were traded between neighbors, over the fence. In many cases, a plot of land and a cache of viral seeds--grown, harvested and planted in the same region generation after generation--was more valuable than having money in the bank.

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Carrots might be considered the world’s most versatile vegetable, but they  haven’t always enjoyed such a charmed reputation. Today we’re going to talk about carrots: How they became orange, how to store and how to eat carrots in ways you might not have considered.